Around the Web: Personal Boundaries

What’s the role of a teacher’s emotional and political life in the classroom? Several columns at the Chronicle of Higher Education reflected on some aspect of this question recently. Prof Hacker described the value of sharing your own passions and frustrations with your students: it makes the material, and the challenges of tackling it, more…

Around the Web: Blogging to Learn

Blogging might just be the next academic frontier, if you believe the New York Times. But does the medium lend itself to student learning? John Orlando at Faculty Focus thinks it does. Arguing that blogging harkens back to commonplacing, he advocates for blogs as a space where students’ original ideas can smolder until the moment…

Disciplinary Expertise, Interdisciplinary Collaboration

Today’s guest post comes from Cosette Creamer, a J.D.-Ph.D. candidate and Departmental Teaching Fellow in Government, who writes about the benefits and challenges of interdisciplinary teaching. A recent article in the New York Times on St. John’s College observed that “as much of academia fractures into ever more specific disciplines, this tiny college still expects —…

The Woodberry Poetry Room Online

Harvard’s Woodberry Poetry Room recently launched an all-new website in celebration of its 80th anniversary. What does that have to do with teaching and learning? Well, the site provides ready access to hundreds of audio recordings—highlights from the Poetry Room’s historic collection of poets reading their work, as well as from recent Poetry Room readings,…

Around the Web: The Two Faces of Cheating

What does it mean when the teachers do the cheating on their students’ behalf? There has been a raft of scandals this year, in Atlanta, L.A., and New York, in which public-school teachers altered test answers to raise their schools’ scores. Things look similarly upside-down in the conflict of interest between TurnItIn and WriteCheck. Owned by the same company,…