Typology of the Lecture, Part II

Last week we began to develop a taxonomy of lecture types, the idea being to outline a basic toolbox of tactics to use in class planning. Today we add a few more tools to the kit. (Like the first, credit for much of this post’s inspiration and execution goes to Peter J. Frederick, “The Lively…

Typology of the Lecture, Part I

Variety, as we all know, is the spice of life. It’s also the spice of education – as many studies have shown, few tactics awaken student attention as much as shaking things up, at least proverbially, in your classroom. To help plan your lessons in the new semester, we are gathering a (by no means…

Curiosity & the Facial Hair of Emperor Wilhelm II

Regular readers of this blog know well that we here at the Bok Center are awfully big fans of active learning. As numerous studies have found, it’s important to get students invested in their own education, rather than treating them like passive receptacles of data. This is true whether your goal is your students gaining…

Book Review: The Practice of University History Teaching

Alan Booth, Paul Hyland (eds.), The Practice of University History Teaching. Manchester University Press: Manchester 2000. Reviewed by Martin Kroher, Departmental Teaching Fellow in East Asian Languages and Civilizations At first glance the usefulness of the edited volume The Practice of University History Teaching might appear to be limited to teachers in degree programs in history…