Teaching with Objects, Part 1

In this four-part series, Departmental Teaching Fellows Anita Nikkanen (Comparative Literature), Erin Blevins (Organismic and Evolutionary Biology), and Meredith Schweig (Music) reflect on the why, how, and what of teaching with objects. These reflections grew out of “Teaching with Tangible Things: Museum Collections in the Classroom,” a workshop they offered at the Bok Center’s 2012…

Overheard at HILT

Regarding the time we spend teaching, one HILT presenter asked, Assuming we see increases in teaching productivity (faster grading, more efficient learning) thanks to technological change, what are we going to do with productivity gains? What are we going to do with our free time? What do you think? How would your teaching change if…

Drawing Words and Writing Pictures

Today’s guest post comes from Anna Mudd, Curriculum Coordinator at the Center for Middle Eastern Studies Outreach Center and MTS ’09.  What are the possibilities for creation and production of visual art in the university classroom?  How can we encourage students to not only criticize and consume but also produce visual communication?  What kinds of…

THE FEMINIST CLASSROOM

Friday, March 30, 2012, 12 noon – 5:00 pm Location: The Thompson Room, Barker Center, Harvard University Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/events/172448962866346/ A half-day conference and workshop for graduate students and postdocs developing a professional teaching profile in women’s, gender, and sexuality studies. Workshop a syllabus that you are developing for job applications or for a course proposal Get…

Book Review: The Practice of University History Teaching

Alan Booth, Paul Hyland (eds.), The Practice of University History Teaching. Manchester University Press: Manchester 2000. Reviewed by Martin Kroher, Departmental Teaching Fellow in East Asian Languages and Civilizations At first glance the usefulness of the edited volume The Practice of University History Teaching might appear to be limited to teachers in degree programs in history…

Understanding By Design

Understanding By Design, Grant Wiggins and Jay McTighe Reviewed by Jason Dowd, Departmental Teaching Fellow in Physics The idea is simple enough.  In teaching, you first identify the desired results. Once that’s done, you figure out what students could do that would be evidence of such results.  Finally, you plan activities and learning experiences geared…

A Reader Writes . . .

Nathan Stein, a graduate student and this year’s Departmental Teaching Fellow in the Statistics Department, wrote in to share an insight he had while listening to Steven Pinker’s talk at the recent HILT Symposium: [Pinker] said that the challenge of writing was converting a network of ideas into a linear string of words. He also…